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    32 MJ SONGS REVIEWED BY ROLLING STONE

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    EMPATHY
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    32 MJ SONGS REVIEWED BY ROLLING STONE

    Post  EMPATHY on Tue Jun 01, 2010 8:41 pm

    http://spotifyplaylists.wordpress.com/2009/06/27/michael-jackson-review-rolling-stone-magazine/

    A fantastic 32-song review published by the Rolling Stone Magazine
    yesterday compiled into a Spotify Playlist here; Rolling Stones 32-song Michael Review Read the full
    review here.
    I Want You Back …eleven-year-old Michael’s voice on
    this tune is a wonder: aching and expressive like the best of his
    years-older soul peers, dicing up syllables on the verses and clinging
    on to long sustains in the chorus.
    Rock With You ….a silky string section and
    barely-there twitch of guitar — Michael doesn’t even hit the word “Rock”
    all that hard — he just glides over it, preferring to charm with a wink
    and a smile rather than with aggression or ferocity.
    Billie Jean …that sudden, diving string section,
    the stray doodles of organ, Michael’s sampled gasp turning up between
    measures like he’s coming up for air. It’s been said before, but it’s
    worth repeating: “Billie Jean” is a masterpiece…
    Give In to Me …this strange, sinister number about
    obsessive love from Dangerous is all ice and shadows. Jackson sounds
    agonized on the chorus, and Slash’s eerie descending arpeggios envelop
    the song like spiderwebs…
    Thriller …Jackson and Quincy Jones surround those
    lyrics with such spectacular robo-funk — that simple six-note synth riff
    rolling over and over, unmistakable and unforgettable…
    Human Nature …Simple, stark, quiet and beautiful and
    boasting a windswept synth-string part that Nas would later sample for
    “It Ain’t Hard to Tell,” “Human Nature” is one of Jackson’s most subtle
    and affecting ballads. The way his voice tumbles down..
    Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’ ” 
…The refrain sounds
    like confrontation, but in between the title’s repeated jabs come
    genuine sympathy: “You’re stuck in the middle, and the pain is thunder.”
    The song is Motown revisited, its roaming synth-bass a stand-in for..
    The Way You Make Me Feel …cruises slowly on a
    rubberband bass line elevated by Jackson’s ecstatic whoops and yelps.
    Every piece of this song is in perfect place, the big brass punctuating
    each of Jackson’s heartfelt demonstrations of affection.
    Smooth Criminal …Tense and agitated, Jackson turns
    his voice into a machine gun, reducing the verses to a hail of tiny
    sounds. He pulls off a mean feat in this one, seeming to sympathize with
    both the aggressor and the aggressee, his hoarse …
    Black or White Jackson’s soulful vocal framed by a
    bright, ringing guitar phrase. Jackson had the tendency to skew obvious
    when being topical, but “Black or White” keenly smuggles social
    commentary into a love song…
    In the Closet …On this 1991 song, he seems to be
    imagining the whole of post-’00s pop music. The beats are
    Timbaland-tiny, and Jackson’s voice is barely more than a stutter until
    the chorus, where he stretches out long and lean and limber.
    Scream …the Jacksons bitterly lashing out against
    doubters and naysayers over a fierce electro backdrop — one periodically
    pierced by Jackson’s pained yelps.
    I Can’t Help It …
Michael does Stevie: a light,
    elegant Wonder-ful ballad finds Jackson scaling back his vocal assault,
    floating just above a lush bed of organ and bass. He takes his time on
    this one, making its pleasures simple but irresistible.
    Leave Me Alone ..sounds like vintage Michael: a
    batch of thick chords for Jackson to vamp over, a kind of darker
    inversion of “The Way You Make Me Feel.” This time, though, that way was
    worked-up and angry…
    P.Y.T. … cruises cleanly up the center of the
    burbling backdrop; like most early hits, “P.Y.T.” finds Jackson at his
    most controlled, saving his big yearning yelps for the chorus, and
    making them all the more indelible by their infrequency.
    Beat It …marvelous simplicity: that simple, toothy
    guitar attack and one of Jackson’s fiercer vocal attacks. This is edgy
    Michael at his best, and Eddie Van Halen’s searing central solo only
    serves as a mirror of Jackson’s own urgency…
    I Want You Back …eleven-year-old Michael’s voice on
    this tune is a wonder: aching and expressive like the best of his
    years-older soul peers, dicing up syllables on the verses and clinging
    on to long sustains in the chorus.
    Rock With You …a silky string section and
    barely-there twitch of guitar — Michael doesn’t even hit the word “Rock”
    all that hard — he just glides over it, preferring to charm with a wink
    and a smile rather than with aggression or ferocity.
    Billie Jean …that sudden, diving string section, the
    stray doodles of organ, Michael’s sampled gasp turning up between
    measures like he’s coming up for air. It’s been said before, but it’s
    worth repeating: “Billie Jean” is a masterpiece…
    Give In to Me …this strange, sinister number about
    obsessive love from Dangerous is all ice and shadows. Jackson sounds
    agonized on the chorus, and Slash’s eerie descending arpeggios envelop
    the song like spiderwebs…
    Thriller …Jackson and Quincy Jones surround those
    lyrics with such spectacular robo-funk — that simple six-note synth riff
    rolling over and over, unmistakable and unforgettable…
    Human Nature Simple, stark, quiet and beautiful and
    boasting a windswept synth-string part that Nas would later sample for
    “It Ain’t Hard to Tell,” “Human Nature” is one of Jackson’s most subtle
    and affecting ballads. The way his voice tumbles down..
    Wanna Be Startin’ Somethin’ …The refrain sounds like
    confrontation, but in between the title’s repeated jabs come genuine
    sympathy: “You’re stuck in the middle, and the pain is thunder.” The
    song is Motown revisited, its roaming synth-bass a stand-in for..
    The Way You Make Me Feel …cruises slowly on a
    rubberband bass line elevated by Jackson’s ecstatic whoops and yelps.
    Every piece of this song is in perfect place, the big brass punctuating
    each of Jackson’s heartfelt demonstrations of affection.
    Smooth Criminal …Tense and agitated, Jackson turns
    his voice into a machine gun, reducing the verses to a hail of tiny
    sounds. He pulls off a mean feat in this one, seeming to sympathize with
    both the aggressor and the aggressee, his hoarse …
    Black or White …Jackson’s soulful vocal framed by a
    bright, ringing guitar phrase. Jackson had the tendency to skew obvious
    when being topical, but “Black or White” keenly smuggles social
    commentary into a love song…
    In the Closet …On this 1991 song, he seems to be
    imagining the whole of post-’00s pop music. The beats are
    Timbaland-tiny, and Jackson’s voice is barely more than a stutter until
    the chorus, where he stretches out long and lean and limber.
    Scream …the Jacksons bitterly lashing out against
    doubters and naysayers over a fierce electro backdrop — one periodically
    pierced by Jackson’s pained yelps.
    I Can’t Help It …Michael does Stevie: a light,
    elegant Wonder-ful ballad finds Jackson scaling back his vocal assault,
    floating just above a lush bed of organ and bass. He takes his time on
    this one, making its pleasures simple but irresistible.
    Leave Me Alone ..sounds like vintage Michael: a
    batch of thick chords for Jackson to vamp over, a kind of darker
    inversion of “The Way You Make Me Feel.” This time, though, that way was
    worked-up and angry…
    P.Y.T. … cruises cleanly up the center of the
    burbling backdrop; like most early hits, “P.Y.T.” finds Jackson at his
    most controlled, saving his big yearning yelps for the chorus, and
    making them all the more indelible by their infrequency.
    Beat It …marvelous simplicity: that simple, toothy
    guitar attack and one of Jackson’s fiercer vocal attacks. This is edgy
    Michael at his best, and Eddie Van Halen’s searing central solo only
    serves as a mirror of Jackson’s own urgency…



    _________________
    "You and I must make a pact, we must bring salvation back,
    whenever you need me, I,ll be there".

    - MICHAEL JACKSON TAROT
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    Joygirl

    Posts : 230
    Join date : 2010-03-02

    Re: 32 MJ SONGS REVIEWED BY ROLLING STONE

    Post  Joygirl on Tue Jun 01, 2010 10:09 pm

    Thanks for this, I love reading about his work

      Current date/time is Fri Nov 17, 2017 2:48 pm